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Irregular Verbs

Regular Verbs

Verbs in English have three tense forms: the base form (or infinitive without “to”), the past simple, and the past participle. For convenience, we can call them “verb-1”, “verb-2”, and “verb-3”.

With regular verbs, the past simple and past participles are formed by adding -d or -ed, or -ied (in place of most y endings) to the end.

Most English verbs are regular.

Irregular verbs do not follow this rule.

Irregular Verbs

One kind of irregular verb changes form, but the past tense and the past participle are the same. Examples include feed, fed, fed; and win, won, won.

Answer the following questions or respond to the statements. Say why and give examples.

Slide Slid Slid

1. slide, slid, slid
There was an accident on the freeway today. What happened?

1. sneak, sneaked (snuck), sneaked (snuck)
Warren, a runaway, didn’t have any money; but he sailed on the ship. How?

2. speed, sped, sped
Mr. Knowles sped to the hospital. Why?

3. spell, spelled (spelt), spelled (spelt)
Jeff wrote a letter in English; Jae Wook wrote in Korean. Who spelt more words incorrectly? Who make more spelling mistakes?

4. spend, spent, spent
Irene and Stanley feel desperate. Why? Is this good or bad?

5. spill, spilled (spilt), spilled (spilt)
There’s no use crying over spilt milk. Give examples from real life.

Spin Spun Spun

6. spin, spun, spun
The dancers spun around and around. What happened when they stopped?

7. spit, spat (spit), spat (spit)
Tommy’s mother scolded him. Why?

8. stand, stood, stood
When the president (queen, winner) entered the hall,

9. stick, stuck, stuck
We can’t drive anymore. Why not?

10. sting, stung, stung
The robbers were going to raid the church — but they turned back. Why?

Strike Struck Struck

11. strike, struck, struck

What will happen if a person strikes another person?

Paul stuck a match in non-smoking building. What happened?

12. sweep, swept, swept
The revolution swept away the old regime. Give specific examples.

13. teach, taught, taught
My favorite teachers taught me………

14. tell, told, told
The whistle-blower told the newspaper (journalist) all of the organization’s secrets. Was this good or bad?

15. think, thought, thought
In ancient times, people though………

Win Won Won

16. win, won, won
Who have won Nobel Prizes from your country?

17. wind, wound, wound
Smedley wound his clock on Thursday, but forgot to wind it on Sunday. What happened?

Other Irregular Verbs

18. go went gone
In the past, everyone went to the movie theater (cinema). Yes or no?

Many university graduates have gone to Germany. Why?

19. become became become
After drinking the magic potion,

20. fly flew flown
Who was Neil Armstrong? Who is Buzz Aldrin?

Irregular Verbs Regular Verbs Verbs in English have three tense forms: the base form (or infinitive without “to”), the past simple, and the past participle. For convenience, we can call them

Why do we say “I win” instead of “I won”?

For a long time I was wondering why there is I win instead of I won. I met such usage in a lot of games and movies.

For me, it’s logical to say I won, because this winning action is done already. I win for me seems like I’m winning right now.

Can anyone clarify this for me?

6 Answers 6

I disagree with the accepted answer in its explanation. If you’ve just had lunch, you’d say “I ate” (past-tense) and not “I eat” (present tense) – even if you’re saying it “just a few seconds after” having lunch. It is absurd to argue that “I win” is used because the winning has only happened in the recent past, it is being carried over to the present (although a runner might say “I win” as he is overtaking another runner).This is sledging, whereas the usage above is clearly about semantics/phraseology.

When you say “I win,” you’re being helpful – by effectively speaking for/on behalf of an umpire/adjudicator (or a referee), who is the proper authority to declare the winner. Conventionally, an umpire would say “Player X wins“, and not “Player X won“.

If there was a third person (acting as an adjudicator) physically present, and he declares one of the two players the winner, you’d certainly say “I won!” even if it was immediately/seconds after.

In linguistics, there are three honorifics assigned to any discourse : the speaker, the hearer and the bystander. Here, the speaker is speaking for the invisible bystander.

You’re also likely to say “I won!” with a particularly tough-to-beat opponent, implying incredulity/emphasis.

Why do we say “I win” instead of “I won”? For a long time I was wondering why there is I win instead of I won . I met such usage in a lot of games and movies. For me, it’s logical to say I