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price is right showcase winners list

Price is right showcase winners list

General site welcome, information and what little rules there are

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 11, currently documented: 4

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 20, total count: 2

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 24, total count: 4

The Double Showcase Winner of Season 25, total count: 1

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 27, total count: 5

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 28, total count: 3

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 29, total count: 5

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 30, total count: 2

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 31, total count: 7

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 32, total count: 5

The Double Showcase Winners or Season 33, total count: 8

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 34, total count: 8

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 35, total count: 3

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 36, total count: 7

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 37, total count: 8

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 38, total count: 3

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 39, total count: 10

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 40, total count: 4

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 41, total count: 3

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 42, total count: 5

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 43, total count: 5

The Double Showcase Winner of Season 44, total count: 1

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 45, total count: 5

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 46, total count: 8

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 48, total count: 3

The Double Showcase Winners of Season 49. Current count: 1

The Double Showcase Winners of all Primetime Specials and Episodes combined, current count: 2

Double Showcase Winners with incomplete stats such as airdates, prizes and total DSWs in a season

Price is right showcase winners list General site welcome, information and what little rules there are The Double Showcase Winners of Season 11, currently documented: 4 The Double Showcase

The worst Price Is Right showcases of the 1990s

The American Dream: being good enough at economy stuff to acquire some dumb crap your neighbors don’t have.

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We tell our children they can accomplish anything. We want to believe hard work matters more than status. And there’s one place that proves social mobility is limitless.

College?? Wait, which one of you said that? It’s definitely not college. Idiot.

I’m talking about the Showcase portion of The Price Is Right. Using only knowledge of market prices, anybody can climb the ladder and enjoy the ultimate reward of capitalism: owning things that flaunt your wealth.

But the Showcase has one small flaw: sometimes the prizes stink.

The Showcase is the final game of each episode, and the rules are simple. Two contestants are each presented with separate prize packages, called Showcases. Each contestant must estimate the value of their prizes, and the winner is whoever’s closest without exceeding the actual value of the Showcase.

(Note: I originally, and incorrectly, referred to this segment as the Showcase Showdown. That’s a different part of the show, where you spin a giant wheel to earn the right to play for a Showcase. Deepest apologies to all Priceheads out there.)

To be exciting to the average Price Is Right audience (the physical manifestation of the market and its desires), a Showcase must have at least one item from the following list:

  • vacation
  • vehicle
  • television
  • jacuzzi

Even Showcases with those items can be lackluster on an individual level, of course. I don’t particularly want two snowmobiles, but maybe you’re a Utah henchman who wants to kill James Bond. And you also have a henchman roommate.

But if we’re going to be scientific about this – and let me assure you, we’re here to do science – we have to lay out some ground rules.

For a Showcase to be truly bad, it must lack one of the prizes listed above and contain an assembly of products so useless or disjointed as to create little to no utility for the contestant.

I reviewed every episode available on The Price Is Right Episode Guide from 1990 through 1999 to hunt down the crummiest Showcase packages. These are my results.

5. Episode 1244K, November 4, 1999: Dining room group, 12-week dance lessons, jukebox

The Price Is Right often believed you wanted to live in a theme restaurant, though a jukebox is at least one of the more utilitarian expressions of that belief. (Sometimes they’d give you a carousel horse. Look around your house and consider where you’d put a carousel horse that wouldn’t cause anyone who walked into that room to ask, “uh, what’s with the carousel horse?”)

And you’re winning this jukebox in 1999, not 1992. You’re installing a massive, gaudy CD player in your house right as music technology is about to change radically. MP3 players had already hit the market, and the first iPod was less than two years away. This prize will quickly go from quirky conversation piece to bulky relic.

The dance lessons? Look, you came on The Price Is Right to win a trip to Vienna or a sailboat you don’t know how to operate, not get guilted into going to more school.

4 (tie). Episode 7552D, February 20, 1990: Dinette set, “Bad Cats” pinball machine, child’s race car bed, professional range
Episode 8693D, February 10, 1993: Corsican cradle, miniature wine vault, “Hook” pinball machine, dinette set

Because contestants on The Price Is Right are not babies or grade school children, a cradle and a race car bed are prizes we know the winner cannot use themselves, at least not while complying with the manufacturer’s specifications.

That’s how you get sciatica, ma’am The Price Is Right, February 20, 1990

If a contestant has a child of the appropriate age, that’s fortuitous. If they don’t, the contestant now has a very confusing and creepy piece of furniture.

Then there are the pinball machines, which are bulky and noisy but sometimes an opportunity to show off your affinities. You thought Jurassic Park was amazing! You’re a really big AC/DC fan! Unfortunately, these Showcases let you choose between allying yourself with this .

. or the movie where Dustin Hoffman sticks a sword into a child’s heart.

2. Episode 8824D, May 13, 1993: Display cabinet, soda fountain, desk and chair, 10 pairs of dumbbells

Do the dumbbells go in the display cabinet? Who just has a soda fountain in their residence, and do you have to sign up for syrup delivery, as though your home has become a Burger King?

Imagine your body getting exercise equipment and limitless sugar drink at the same time. How is it supposed to react to this wildly mixed message?

The Showcase is capitalism at its purest. No wheel to spin, no timer to race. Just two competitors, jousting to see who has the keener understanding of market value. (It’s also a particularly good metaphor for capitalism because both finalists can lose.) The platonic ideal of a Showcase offers you a tantalizing vision of the luxury life you’re this close to enjoying.

The future you see in this Showcase? It’s a lackluster garage sale.

Before I give you the worst ‘90s Showcase, I must discuss one of the most perplexing. It includes vehicles and two trips, so it cannot make our scientifically rigorous list, but it requires further examination. Let’s call this a bonus round.

Episode 9973D, May 8, 1996: New York Jets season tickets, six-night trip to New York City, two jet skis, six night trip to Bali

Bali seems lovely, there’s plenty to do in New York on someone else’s dime, and jet skis are awesome. If this Showcase just had those three prizes, it’d be downright wonderful.

The Jets tickets, though.

Let’s assume those are season tickets for the 1996 season. How’d the team do that year?

YIKES. The one win wasn’t at home, so this prize is more accurately described as “spend eight days watching the Jets lose in person.” This dreadful season wasn’t entirely surprising either, as the Jets had just gone 3-13 in 1995.

The Price Is Right has given out season tickets several times, but this is the only instance I could find in which the show awarded tickets to see a team outside of Southern California, where the show is taped. Why the Jets, of all teams?

Moreover, why does this Showcase include a trip to New York City and season tickets for the New York Jets? You have to live in or near New York for the tickets to be useful, in which case the value of the trip is greatly diminished.

You might be thinking you can just sell these tickets. But it’s 1996, so you’re getting actual paper tickets, and you have no easy way to sell them or transfer them online. eBay wasn’t much of a thing until 1997. Best case, you’re selling the whole package to someone who knows the team is bad and might not give you full price.

Slightly worse: you go try to scalp them in person every week.

Worse than that: you do this while not living near New York City.

Though that is still preferable to the absolute bottom: you attend every home game the ‘96 Jets play.

Here’s the best part: a real person had to figure out what to do with these tickets. A woman named Carol won this Showcase. I have no idea what she did with the tickets, and I desperately want to hear her story.

1. Episode 9242D, June 7, 1994: Dinette set, archery set, player piano

How many people do you think exist in the middle of this Venn diagram?

Because other than that small segment of the population, there is only one possible use for this Showcase: you’d like to film your own Western movie or television show.

The archery set requires you to learn a fairly difficult and dangerous skill, and even then I’m not sure how much you’ll enjoy it. The player piano takes an object that also requires skill, then removes it so you can listen to “Camptown Races” in your living room.

Conclusively, this was the worst Showcase that a Price Is Right contestant was asked to bid on in the 1990s. Does this episode prove that capitalism is a lie?

This Showcase, instead of bestowing fun useless junk like an RV or a giant television or six nights in Tempe, had only weird and bad useless junk.

It’s kind of like having hundreds of millions of dollars, but spending it on owning the New York Jets.

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The American Dream: being good enough at economy stuff to acquire some dumb crap your neighbors don’t have.