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Lottery discussion

2. Jackson’s story depicts an ancient fertility ritual inexplicably practiced in an American small town:
Each June, a townsperson is chosen to be sacrificed so that crops will grow. What concerns
Haugaard and Leo is the students’ nonjudgmentalism—their inability to object to the story’s central
action. While a woman is stoned to death by her husband and children, Haugaard’s students
refuse to condemn the ceremony. Questioned by Haugaard, one student would not oppose the practice,
explaining that it might be “a religion of long standing” (4). The student’s attempt at multicultural
understanding worries both Haugaard and Leo, who see in it a troubling moral relativism.
Haugaard likens it to another student’s diversity training, wherein hospital staff “are taught not to
judge” an action “if it is part of a person’s culture” (5). Leo worries that such “moral shrugging”
creates a generation “unwilling to oppose large moral horrors, including human sacrifice” (2).
At the same time, both Leo and Haugaard note that students are not too reluctant to express “oldfashioned
and rigorous moral criticism” on certain issues like smoking, environmentalism, and animal
rights (4, 6). In Haugaard’s and Leo’s view, the student readers of “The Lottery” swing between
cultural relativism and strident belief: As Leo explains, students hesitate to condemn egregious
evils if such acts reflect cultural mores (2), but they don’t hesitate to “say flatly that treating
humans as superior to dogs and rodents is immoral” (6). To Leo, students’ inability to experience
moral outrage about historical evils is evidence that they have lost their moral compass.

1. Leo opens his essay dramatically. As opposed to the neutral language of a dictionary entry, the
first paragraph presents a disturbing moral problem: Professor Robert Simon’s students
“acknowledge” the historical existence of the Holocaust, but they cannot condemn the genocide
(1). As one student explains, “Of course I dislike the Nazis . . . but who is to say they are
morally wrong?” (1) This opening example—of students unwilling or unable to condemn horrible
acts—is echoed throughout the essay. In an extended discussion of Shirley Jackson’s “The
Lottery,” a story about ritual sacrifice, Leo tells us that “a class discussion of human sacrifice
yielded no moral comments” (4). Leo’s purpose seems clear: He is outraged by the students’ lack
of moral outrage and wants to readers to share his shock and disbelief. Formal definitions would
blunt the essay’s impact, switching attention from the students’ disconcerting moral relativism to
the more cut and dry issue of definition. Leo wisely introduces definition only after the major
work of his essay—establishing protest, shock, and disbelief at students’ being “taught not to
judge” (5)—has been accomplished.

4. Leo pulls no punches in his discussion of absolutophobia. His aim is clear: to describe and condemn
the “growing problem” of nonjudgmentalism (2). In so doing, Leo does not hide his disdain.
He uses figurative language to cast the absolutophobia phenomenon in a most unfavorable light.
In paragraph 2, he describes students as “overdosing on nonjudgmentalism,” evoking the unsavory
world of drugs and addiction. He also describes multiculturalism as “spreading the vapors of nonjudgmentalism”
(5), calling to mind strong odors, pollution, and disease. As he discusses Kay
Haugaard’s experience in teaching “The Lottery,” he includes sarcastic asides and caustic descriptions.
When Haugaard states that the story’s “message about blind conformity always spoke to my
students’ sense of right and wrong” (4), Leo responds: “No longer, apparently” (4). He also makes
sure to include Haugaard’s dismissive description of one of her students as a “50-something redheaded
nurse” (5). Finally, Leo uses language emphasizing his own judgments and moral beliefs.
He calls absolutophobia both “moral shrugging” (6) and a “fashionable phobia” (7). All these
examples of loaded, highly charged language clearly underscore Leo’s belief that absolutophobia
does not merit respect.

Lottery discussion 2. Jackson’s story depicts an ancient fertility ritual inexplicably practiced in an American small town: Each June, a townsperson is chosen to be sacrificed so that crops will

Lottery Discussion

Recommended online casinos

Has anyone had any friends who hit it big on a lottery?

I was in a gas station on Long Island and this guy comes in, buys an $8 pack of smokes, gives the clerk a twenty, says thank you and walks away. Clerk sees that I observed the whole thing and tells me he sold the guy a $3 million dollar lotto ticket and he comes in a few times a week and tips him $10.

The only person I know who won was a bartender who was at a horrible point in his life when he won. He’d dropped a keg on his foot and never had it looked at, continuing to work and stand on it for weeks. In the end, he had three toes amputated which set him on a serious down hill struggle. He started drinking too much, and was a really nasty drunk. He won a couple of million and immediately went into rehab. We kept hearing he was still in rehab but it tuned out he transferred to a clinic in Florida and completely left NY behind. Left his girlfriend, his two grown kids and everyone without a word. I used to see his son, who had been close to his father but now has nothing good to say. Evidently, he didn’t share his winnings with anyone, including his girlfriend that he’d lived with off and on for over a decade.

One of my neighbors, who I didn’t know at all, won $3 million over twenty years and was quoted as saying the $53,000 a year might let her buy better Holiday presents but whose life changes over $50,000 a year. That was about thirty years ago, when 50K had a lot more buying power.

Said he saw the flaw in the game in 3 minutes of looking at it. 26 million later.

Cash For Life has a 1 in 8 odds of winning. That doesn’t seem bad at all until you realize that you are most likely only going to win about $1 extra 95 percent of the time.

Glad this got reopened, because I wanted to ask this:

Nathan, you’ve been here a few years, now it’s time to make your friend Mission146 proud. No cheating!

If the overall odds of the ticket winning are, in fact, one in eight AND of all winning tickets, only 5% win more than $1.00 extra what are the overall odds or probability (your choice) of one ticket winning more than $1 extra?

Has anyone had any friends who hit it big on a lottery?

I was in a gas station on Long Island and this guy comes in, buys an $8 pack of smokes, gives the clerk a twenty, says thank you and walks away. Clerk sees that I observed the whole thing and tells me he sold the guy a $3 million dollar lotto ticket and he comes in a few times a week and tips him $10.

The only person I know who won was a bartender who was at a horrible point in his life when he won. He’d dropped a keg on his foot and never had it looked at, continuing to work and stand on it for weeks. In the end, he had three toes amputated which set him on a serious down hill struggle. He started drinking too much, and was a really nasty drunk. He won a couple of million and immediately went into rehab. We kept hearing he was still in rehab but it tuned out he transferred to a clinic in Florida and completely left NY behind. Left his girlfriend, his two grown kids and everyone without a word. I used to see his son, who had been close to his father but now has nothing good to say. Evidently, he didn’t share his winnings with anyone, including his girlfriend that he’d lived with off and on for over a decade.

One of my neighbors, who I didn’t know at all, won $3 million over twenty years and was quoted as saying the $53,000 a year might let her buy better Holiday presents but whose life changes over $50,000 a year. That was about thirty years ago, when 50K had a lot more buying power.

As a matter of fact, I have. My wife’s cousin’s husband won $1,000,000 with a scratch off. They bought a new car and then spent the rest on CD’s at the bank.

I told my wife that she should have been closer to her side of the family.

All right, I reopened this thread after re-titling it “Lottery Discussion.” This should be a venue to discuss advantage plays in the lottery and general lottery rules and mathematics. It is absolutely prohibited to post lottery picks here and will be punishable with a suspension. I have a feeling this thread will fly off the rails again, in which case my finger is on “close” button and ready to click on it.

They didn’t just use math. They also had access to lottery terminals. In my mind, that makes what they were doing slightly unfair. The same sort of thing goes on in horse racing with big players having faster and direct tote access.

This couple says there were no victims, but there were. Just people who lost a very little bit of ev.

They didn’t just use math. They also had access to lottery terminals. In my mind, that makes what they were doing slightly unfair. The same sort of thing goes on in horse racing with big players having faster and direct tote access.

This couple says there were no victims, but there were. Just people who lost a very little bit of ev.

Can you expand on that? They didn’t mention that on 60 Minutes. How did the lottery terminals help?

Has anyone had any friends who hit it big on a lottery?I was in a gas station on Long Island and this guy comes in, buys an $8 pack of smokes, gives the…