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16 to Life

Synopsis

Romantic comedy. A small town teenager’s angst about sexual inexperience drives a comic quest for love and understanding on a birthday to end all birthdays.

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118 mins More details at IMDb TMDb Report this film

Popular reviews

I hate the midwest so fucking much

I THOUGHT YOU WOULD FIND IT INTERESTING THAT PEOPLE CAN BE ADDICTED TO CHAPSTICK AND TECHNICALLY ITS NOT THE CHAPSTICK THATS ADDICTIVE ITS THE PUTTING IT ON THATS ADDICTIVE *cries*

A quiet little quirk-com about a small town girl’s 16th birthday. It’s a whole lot of not-much-happening, but it’s charming enough overall to keep my interest.

This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

the fact that rene turned out to be gay saved this melodramatic, anticlimactic, coming of age. I guess i could’ve liked this if i watched it when i was 13 or something

Cute, funny, coming of age.

Recent reviews

I actually really liked this it feels really genuine and reminds me of working at my job during the summer.

I hate the midwest so fucking much

i cant explain it but this felt like a british tv show at times

Saw a review that said they would have liked this as a TV show. I agree; it’s kinda Gilmoreish.

would honestly love it as a tv show

I THOUGHT YOU WOULD FIND IT INTERESTING THAT PEOPLE CAN BE ADDICTED TO CHAPSTICK AND TECHNICALLY ITS NOT THE CHAPSTICK THATS ADDICTIVE ITS THE PUTTING IT ON THATS ADDICTIVE *cries*

Cute, but forgettable

A quiet little quirk-com about a small town girl’s 16th birthday. It’s a whole lot of not-much-happening, but it’s charming enough overall to keep my interest.

This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

the fact that rene turned out to be gay saved this melodramatic, anticlimactic, coming of age. I guess i could’ve liked this if i watched it when i was 13 or something

Cute, funny, coming of age.

Review from my VOD column “This Week on Demand”.

Clearly riffing on Clerks in the constitution of its narrative structure, 16 to Life restricts itself to the confines of a single workday at an Iowan fast food stand, centring primarily on Kate as she celebrates her sixteenth birthday and laments her non-existent love life while meddling in that of her co-workers. Adherent to formula with very few exceptions, it’s a decidedly unremarkable but undeniably charming story, writer/director Becky Smith graduating from a career in television—How to Look Good Naked being her most noteworthy credit—with commendable success. Her dialogue, as delivered by a cast who seamlessly interlock, brings a naturalistic appeal to the comedy, perfectly capturing the atmosphere of this workplace. Well-intentioned dramatic efforts contribute a nice sense of character depth, Kate and her friends each fleshed-out to a restricted but effective extent in their various subplots as they while the day away with their entertaining interactions.

There isn’t a whole lot to say about this because it has an extremely small story and scope, so I’ll keep it short. 16 to life is about a girl who’s about to turn 16 and has never been kissed. While she plays matchmaker for her friends and they rely on her for advice, she hasn’t had much luck herself. She loves to read and has a genuine warmth about her. The entire film takes place over the course of her 16th birthday, when she is continually shitted on by fate and disappointment. Will she end her 16th birthday with her first kiss or will it be just like any other day?

It’s cute, it makes you feel good, and it’s full of fun and beautiful people. It’s very safe, but it’s enjoyable. It reminded me a lot of Ten Inch Hero, a much better indie comedy in my opinion.

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Romantic comedy. A small town teenager's angst about sexual inexperience drives a comic quest for love and understanding on a birthday to end all birthdays.

Nia Long Says Fatal Affair Was Originally Supposed to Have a White Cast

The new Netflix thriller, co-starring Omar Epps, premieres today.

  • Netflix’s latest thriller, Fatal Affair, premieres on Thursday, July 16.
  • The film stars Nia Long and Omar Epps in their first movie together since 2004’s Alfie.
  • OprahMag.com talked with Long and Epps about reuniting on the screen after 16 years, and how Fatal Affair initially was meant to have a predominantly white cast.

As soon as the trailer for Netflix’s new thriller Fatal Affair was released in June, fans on social media (including me) had a fit. Because the combination of Hollywood legends Nia Long and Omar Epps, plus the track that played—Joe’s “All The Things (Your Man Won’t Do)” —was a recipe for peak ’90s nostalgia.

Admittedly, Fatal Affair has a storyline that we’ve seen a lot. (Some would say too often). Hardworking lawyer Ellie’s (Long) marriage to her dreamy husband Marcus (Stephen Bishop) is in a rut, so she slips up and has a brief affair with David (Epps), an old college friend who suddenly reappears in her life. But after she ends their relationship, David doesn’t quite get the hint, and he soon proves to be incredibly unhinged.

Predictable? Yes, but the film is set in the breathtaking San Francisco Bay area, and gives you major beach house envy. Plus, a reunion between Long, 49, and Epps, 46, is irresistible. Their last film together was 2004’s comedy Alfie, and they co-starred for the first time as love interests in 1999’s crime thriller In Too Deep.

“Omar is like my brother, so when I read the script he was the first person I thought of,” Long tells OprahMag.com. “This is a different genre for both of us. I thought it would be really interesting for him to play a character that was twisted and delusional and really scary. I’ve never done a thriller, and I wanted some good back-up so I called my friend Omar.”

Epps added: “It’s like picking up where we left off. I call Nia my ‘creative kindred.’ We just kind of understand each other, have our shorthand for a better experience. To get to play a guy who’s just playing by his own rules and just unpredictable, that was just really, really fun and freeing for me creatively.”

Long, who’s a producer on the film, explained that when she was first presented with the script for Fatal Affair—which was co-penned by Peter Sullivan and up-and-comer Rasheeda Garner— it was “written for a white cast.” But before she signed on to play the lead, keeping in mind that more Black voices are necessary both in-front of and behind the camera, the actress wanted to make sure it was just right.

“Netflix and the producers supported that, and we started to make changes to the script just so it felt like my voice, and there were certain things that we changed to accommodate who I am and then to accommodate the rest of the cast,” she says. “That to me says that studios were open to doing what’s necessary to keep diversity at the forefront. What you’re seeing right now are white actors saying, ‘Hey listen, I’m not gonna do the voiceover for a Black character. I’m a white person. I’m going to step down and allow that to be played by a Black person.’ That’s their opportunity and their right to play that character.”

You can stream Fatal Affair on Netflix on Thursday, July 16.

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Netflix's thriller, Fatal Affair, premiers on Thursday, July 16. The film stars Nia Long and Omar Epps in their first movie together since Alfie (2004). ]]>