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1.5 billion powerball winner dies

Powerball Jackpot Winner Dies Of Cocaine Overdose After Partying With Hookers

1 of the 3 $1.5B Powerball jackpot winners was found in his new multi-million dollar home dead of an accidental cocaine overdose.

31 Year-old James Hugston was 1 of the 3 lucky winners to hit the billion dollar jackpot. He received an estimated $327 million lump sum. His first purchase was a multi-million dollar furnished home.

Rick Kingston a close friends of James said he was trying to keep his identity a secret and was doing it well by quickly moving out his 2 bedroom apartment where he lived with his girlfriend who he broke up with once he won.

At the multi-million dollar home where James Hugston was found dead over a kilo of cocaine was found close friend Rick Kingston said “James went crazy fast! First he bought this huge house then cocaine and invited over 10 hookers from backpage” a website know for prostitution.

It is unclear what will happen with the remaining of his winnings James Hugston only has 1 living family member his 60 year old mother Melissa Hugston who has not commented on this tragic situation.

Powerball Jackpot Winner Dies Of Cocaine Overdose After Partying With Hookers 1 of the 3 $1.5B Powerball jackpot winners was found in his new multi-million dollar home dead of an accidental

Winner of $1.5 Billion Lottery Comes Forward (Well, Sort of. Through a Lawyer.)

An anonymous person in South Carolina finally claimed the record-setting prize from October’s $1.54 billion Mega Millions jackpot, opting to collect a one-time lump sum of $877,784,124.

The state’s lottery commission announced on Monday that the person had stepped forward, ending questions about why, five months after the winning numbers were announced, no one had claimed the money. It was the largest payout to a single lottery winner in United States history.

The winner had until April 19 to claim the money.

Winning the lottery comes with a long list of difficult decisions, which may explain the delay in making the claim. Thus far, the winner has followed the typical playbook to minimize or avoid potential complications: The person has stayed anonymous, and has gotten help.

The winner retained Jason M. Kurland, a New York lawyer who has branded himself the “Lottery Lawyer” after representing several high-profile winners. In October, Mr. Kurland told The New York Times that the biggest challenge is making sure the windfall does not ruin personal relationships.

“It’s natural there’s going to be a strain,” Mr. Kurland said. “It depends on how strong your relationships are before the lottery. If you’re really close with someone and they feel they deserve a gift, it’s really difficult. It’s one of the things winners are freaked out about when they come to me.”

The winner was fortunate to be a resident of South Carolina, one of a handful of states where winners are allowed to remain anonymous. In other states, winners have to sit through a news conference, and the publicity can attract all varieties of vultures who would look to take advantage.

The winning $2 ticket — 5, 28, 62, 65, 70; and the Mega Ball: 5 — was sold at a convenience store, KC Mart No. 7, in Simpsonville. The store’s owner, C.J. Patel, will receive $50,000.

The winner had about a 1 in 302 million shot to get it right.

The South Carolina Education Lottery Commission said in a statement that the winner “marvels at how every decision made that day brought the winner to the store, at that very moment, to make the Quick Pick Mega Millions lottery ticket purchase.” The winner had allowed another customer to make a ticket purchase in front of him or her in line, the commission said.

“A simple act of kindness led to an amazing outcome,” it said.

Lottery profits support higher education, scholarships, K-12 programs and community education programs, the lottery commission said. South Carolina will receive about $61 million in income taxes from the winner.

The winner chose the smaller lump sum over an annuity, which would have paid out the full $1.54 billion in smaller payments over 30 years. Most people take the one-time cash payment, but it is not an easy decision.

The winner, who has retained a lawyer who calls himself the “Lottery Lawyer,” bought the ticket in South Carolina, one of a few states where winners may remain anonymous. ]]>